1. The most important risk factors are:
· History of cancer in one breast.
· Family history of premenopausal bilateral B.C.
· Age.

2. The main point in previous history are:
· Chronic cystic mastitis with atypical hyperplasia.
· A previous incidence of contralateral B.C
· A previous adenocarcinoma.

The main point in family history are:
· A first degree relative of a patient with bilateral B.C.
· A first degree relative of a patient with premenopausal B.C.
· A first degree relative of a patient with bilateral premenopausal B.C.

3. The most frequent signs and symptoms are:

· Breast lumps between 85 to 90% of patients.
· Metastatic disease.
· Retraction or inversion of a nipple.
· Observable skin dimpling.
· Bloody discharge.
· Firm masses.
· Lack of tenderness.

4. Diagnosis may be done by:
· Self examination.
· Physical examination.
· Mammography.
· Ultrasound.
· Biopsy.

5. Treatment may be done by means of:
· Surgery.
· Radiation.
· Chemotherapy.
· Hormones therapy.

6. Prognosis depends on a number of clinical and histologic factors at the times of diagnosis.